Challenge Update

I’m taking part in 6 Challenges this year. Clicking on the challenge titles takes you to my Progress Pages:

Calendar of Crime

Twelve books, one representing each month, are required for a completed challenge. In addition challengers are encouraged to read more than one/all category/ies for each month.

So far I have read 11 books that qualify for the different categories covering 9 months of the year – nothing yet for January, April and June.

European Reading ChallengeERC Map 2019

The aim is to read books by European authors or books set in European countries, each book must be by a different author and set in a different country. I’m going for the FIVE STAR (DELUXE ENTOURAGE) which is to: Read at least five books by different European authors or books set in different European countries.

So far, I’ve read 4.

Mount TBR Challenge

Books must be owned by you prior to January 1, 2019. No library books.  Any reread may count, regardless of how long you’ve owned it prior to 2019, provided you have not read it in last five years. I’m aiming to get to the top of Mont Blanc, that is to read 24 books and hope to move up to the higher levels if I can.

I have read 15 up to now.

What’s In A Name?WhatsinaName14

So far I have read 3 books from the 6 categories. The categories I have yet to fill are books with titles that fit into these 3 categories:

  • A precious stone/metal
  • A month or day of the week
  • Contains both the words “of” AND “and”

e5ba7-virtual2bmount2btbr2bblog

The Virtual Mount TBR Challenge

This is for books you do not own. They may be borrowed from the library, a friend, or anywhere else. I am aiming to climb Mount Rum Doodle – that is, 12 books.

So far I have read 6 library books.

When Are You Reading Challenge

For this you are required to read one book predominantly set in each of the twelve time periods, from pre-1300 up to the Future.

I have read books for 4 of the periods so far covering the periods 1500 – 1699, 1900-1919, 1920-1939 and 1940-1959.

Calendar of Crime Challenge 2019

I read a lot of crime fiction so it seems only right to take part in this new challenge for 2019 devised and hosted by Bev at My Reader’s Block. This is a reading challenge that allows mystery readers to include any mystery regardless of publication date. If it falls in a mystery category (crime fiction/detective novel/police procedural/suspense/thriller/spy & espionage/hard-boiled/cozy etc.), then it counts and it does not matter if it was published in 1892 or 2019.

The Challenge runs from January 1, 2019 to December 31, 2019. All books should be read during this time period and you can sign up on Bev’s blog at any time between now and November 1, 2019.

I have summarised the rules below – for all the details see Bev’s sign up post.

  • All books must be mysteries.
  • Twelve books, one representing each month, are required for a completed challenge. Each month comes with several categories (see chart above) that may be selected to fulfil the month’s reading.
  • The “wild card” book is exactly that.
  • For the category that says “Book title contains a word that starts with the letter A,” the following do not count: “A” and “An.”
  • Books may only count for one month and one category, but they may count for other challenges.
  • Books do not have to be read during the month for which they qualify. So–if you’re feeling like a little “Christmas in July” (or May or…), then feel free to read your book for December whenever the mood strikes.

What’s in a Name 2018

What's In A Name 2018 logo

Next year Charlie at The Worm Hole is hosting the eleventh annual What’s In A Name challenge, originally started by Annie, then handed to Beth Fish Reads and now continued by Charlie. For full details go to the sign up post. I’ve been doing this challenge since Annie started it in 2007, just missing the one in 2009! So, this is a must for me.

The basics

The challenge runs from January to December. During this time you choose a book to read from each of the following categories. (Charlie’s examples of books you could choose are in brackets – translations and other languages most definitely count!):

  • The word ‘the’ used twice (The Secret By The Lake; The End Of The Day, The Curious Incident Of The Dog In The Night-Time)
  • A fruit or vegetable (The Guernsey Literary And Potato Peel Pie Society; The Particular Sadness Of Lemon Cake)
  • A shape (The Ninth Circle, The Square Root Of Summer, Circle Of Friends)
  • A title that begins with Z – can be after ‘The’ or ‘A’ (Zen In The Art Of Writing; The Zookeeper’s Wife, Zelda)
  • A nationality (Anna And The French Kiss; How To Be A Kosovan Bride; Norwegian Wood)
  • A season (White Truffles In Winter; The Spring Of Kasper Meier; The Summer Queen; Before I Fall; The Autumn Throne)

I’ll be choosing from the following books – or any others that I come across before the end of 2018:

The word ‘the’ used twice

  • The King in the North by Max Adams
  • The Lady and the Unicorn by Tracy Chevalier
  • The Chapel in the Woods by Susan Louineau
  • The House by the Churchyard by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
  • The Riddle of the Third Mile by Colin Dexter
  • The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson

A fruit or vegetable 

  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  • Gem Squash Tokoloshi by Rachel Zadok
  • The Olive Readers by Christina Aziz

A title which has a shape in it

  • Dead Men and Broken Hearts by Craig Russell
  • In the Heart of the Sea by Nathaniel Philbrick
  • Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  • Heartstones by Kate Glanville

A title that begins with Z – can be after ‘The’ or ‘A’ 

  • Z: a novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Fowler
  • Zed Alley by Dorte Hummelshoj Jakobsen (do short stories count?)

A nationality

  • The Welsh Girl by Peter Ho Davies
  • Italian Shoes by Henning Mankell

A season

  • Absent in the Spring by Agatha Christie
  • Summer by Edith Wharton
  • The Summer Before the War by Helen Simonson
  • The Winter Garden by Jane Thynne
  • A Place Called Winter by Patrick Gale

2016 Vintage Mystery Scavenger Hunt

This year I’ve been taking part in Bev’s Vintage Mystery Cover Scavenger Hunt  in both the Golden and the Silver Age categories and I’ve completed both categories, reading 10 books in the Golden Age and 6 in the Silver Age.

The aim: to find as many objects on the Scavenger Hunt list as possible on the covers of the mystery books you read. The minimum number of items to complete the challenge is six items from the covers of books read from a single Vintage Mystery Era.

It’s been a very interesting challenge – Bev has some challenging challenges!

The Golden Age Vintage Mysteries must have been first published before 1960.

Most of the books I read in this era are Agatha Christie’s books – 5 in total.

scavenger-hunt1

 

  1. Destination Unknown by Agatha Christie: Cigarette/Pipe
  2. Death Comes as the End by Agatha Christie: a Green Object
  3. Sparkling Cyanide by Agatha Christie: a Bottle for Drinking
  4. The Secret of Chimneys by Agatha Christie: Bloodstains
  5. Miss Pym Disposes by Josephine Tey: More Than Two People
  6. Before the Fact by Francis Iles: Two People
  7. A Shilling for Candles by Josephine Tey: a Body of Water
  8. The Mysterious Mr Quin by Agatha Christie: A Performer
  9. Partners in Crime by Agatha Christie: Shadowy Person
  10. Mystery in the Channel by Freeman Wills Croft: Boat

vintage-golden-age-covers

Silver Age Vintage Mysteries may be first published any time from 1960 to 1989 (inclusive).

Books Read/Silver Age Category:

vintage-covers-silver-age

  1. Wycliffe and the Tangled Web by W J Burley: Body of Water
  2. Wycliffe and the Quiet Virgin by W J Burley: Spooky House/Mansion
  3. The Girl in the Cellar by Patricia Wentworth: ‘˜Damsel in Distress’
  4. The Spy Who Came In From The Cold by John le Carré: Broken Object
  5. The Wench is Dead by Colin Dexter: a Building (other than house)
  6. Frost at Christmas by R D Wingfield: Photograph

vintage-silver-age-covers

What’s in a Name 2016 – Completed

I have now completed the What’s In A Name 2016 challenge, hosted by Charlie at The Worm Hole. The challenge was to read books with titles from six categories. At the beginning of this challenge I listed the books I had initially chosen to read –  but I didn’t read any of them. Instead I realised, usually as I finished reading the books, that they just slotted into the categories.

These are the books I read, with links to my reviews:

  • A countrySunshine on Scotland Street by Alexander McCall Smith – this is an easy read, meandering from one character to the next. It has a light, humorous tone that I enjoyed, along with thoughts about friendship, religion, spirituality and happiness.
  • An item of clothing – A Cupboard Full of Coats by Yvvette Edwards – a beautiful and intense book, dramatic and full of emotion and passion, about relationships and what happens when jealousy and betrayal tear people apart.
  • An item of furnitureA Game of Thrones by George R R Martin – I was completely immersed in the world of the Seven Kingdoms, inhabited by numerous characters, all portrayed in meticulous detail and expertly constructed so that all the fantastic creations are credible, and complete with back stories.
  • A profession – Doctor Thorne by Anthony Trollope –  about mid 19th century prosperous country life and the importance of birth, of wealth and above all about money, class and power. Trollope uses gentle satire, emphasising the absurdities of the class divisions in society and poking fun at the professions.
  • A month of the year – The Madness of July by James Naughtie -a political thriller set in London in the mid 1970s, a book that makes you think, that keeps you on your toes as you read, that both puzzles and entertains you.
  • A title with the word ‘tree’ in itThe Bean Trees by Barbara Kingsolver – I loved this book. There are several themes including family relationships, particularly mother/child, sexual and physical abuse of small children, the integration of cultures, and the issue of refugees and illegal immigrants. I thought it was thought-provoking, as well as being fascinating reading.

I began the challenge in March when I read Doctor Thorne and finished it just a couple of days ago, reading A Cupboard Full of Coats. I enjoyed them all, each one different in style and genre, ranging from a 19th century classic to 21st century fantasy fiction.

What’s in a Name 2017

whats-in-a-name17

Next year Charlie at The Worm Hole is hosting the tenth ‘“ yes, tenth! ‘“ annual What’s In A Name challenge, originally started by Annie, then handed to Beth Fish Reads and now continued by Charlie. For full details go to the sign-up post. I’ve been doing this challenge since Annie started it in 2007, just missing the one in 2009! So, even though I’m cutting back on challenges for 2017, I really want to take part in this one.

The basics

The challenge runs from January to December. During this time you choose a book to read from each of the following categories. (Charlie’s examples of books you could choose are in brackets ‘“ translations and other languages most definitely count!):

  • A number in numbers (84, Charing Cross Road; 12 Years A Slave; 31 Dream Street)
  • A building (The Old Curiosity Shop; I Capture The Castle; House Of Shadows; The Invisible Library; Jamaica Inn)
  • A title which has an ‘˜X’ somewhere in it (The Girl Next Door; The Running Vixen)
  • A compass direction (North and South; Guardians Of The West; The Shadow In The North; NW)
  • An item/items of cutlery (The Subtle Knife; Our Spoons Came From Woolworths)
  • A title in which at least two words share the same first letter ‘“ alliteration! (The Great Gatsby; The Luminous Life Of Lilly Aphrodite; Gone Girl; The Cuckoo’s Calling)

Charlie is asking for one review per category. Where possible I like to read from my TBRs for my challenges and I’ve found the following books on my shelves (some are e-books) for each category and will choose one from each for this challenge.

A number in numbers

  • 1066: What Fates Impose by G K Holloway
  • 1599: a Year in the life of William Shakespeare by James Shapiro
  • 1946: The Making of the Modern World by Victor Sebestyen
  • 3500: An Autistic Boy’s Ten-Year Romance with Snow White by Ron Miles

A building – lots to choose from

  • Citadel by Kate Mosse
  • The Chapel in the Woods by Susan Louineau
  • Corduroy Mansions by Alexander McCall Smith
  • Framley Parsonage by Anthony Trollope
  • Heather Farm by Dorte Hummelshoj Jakobsen
  • The House by the Churchyard by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu
  • The House in the Attic by Helen Cardwell
  • House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende
  • The House on Fever Street by Celina Grace
  • Last Man in Tower by Aravind Adiga
  • The Murder at Sissingham Hall by Clara Benson
  • The Power House by John Buchan

A title which has an ‘˜X’ somewhere in it

  • Exhume by Danielle Girard
  • The Girl Next Door by Ruth Rendell
  • The Mitfords: Letters Between Six Sisters edited by Charlotte Mosley
  • Notes from an Exhibition by Patrick Gale
  • A Place of Execution by Val McDermid
  • The Sex Life of My Aunt by Mavis Cheek
  • The Taxidermist’s Daughter by Kate Mosse

A compass direction

  • The King in the North by Max Adams
  • North and South – Elizabeth Gaskell
  • South Riding by Winifred Holtby

An item/items of cutlery – I thought I must have some crime fiction in my TBRs with ‘knife/knives’ in the title – but I haven’t! I read Charlie’s suggestion of The Subtle Knife several years ago. The only book I have to read in this category is:

  • The Tiny Fork Diet by Alan Sugar

A title in which at least two words share the same first letter ‘“ alliteration!

  • Break No Bones by Kathy Reichs
  • The Child’s Child by Barbara Vine
  • A Death in the Dales by Frances Brody
  • Deja Dead by Kathy Reichs
  • Dialogues of the Dead by Reginald Hill
  • Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn
  • Hangman’s Holiday by Dorothy Sayers
  • The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
  • The Repentant Rake by Edward Marston
  • The Sacred Stone: The Medieval Murderers
  • Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy by John Le Carre
  • Whitethorn Woods by Maeve Binchy

Mount TBR Reading Challenge 2017

It’s that time of year again when next year’s reading challenges begin to appear in the book blogs. Next year I’m not going to take part in many challenges – but this is one I shall definitely be doing:

 

It’s Bev’s Mount TBR Reading Challenge 2017, which will run from 1 January to 31st December 2017. (Click on the link for full details.)

These are the Challenge Levels:

Pike’s Peak: Read 12 books from your TBR pile/s
Mont Blanc: Read 24 books from your TBR pile/s
Mt. Vancouver: Read 36 books from your TBR pile/s
Mt. Ararat: Read 48 books from your TBR piles/s
Mt. Kilimanjaro: Read 60 books from your TBR pile/s
El Toro: Read 75 books from your TBR pile/s
Mt. Everest: Read 100 books from your TBR pile/s
Mount Olympus (Mars): Read 150+ books from your TBR pile/s

Books must be owned by you prior to January 1, 2017. No library books.

So far this year I’ve reached Mt Vancouver and I very much doubt I’ll reach my target of 48 books to get to Mt Ararat. Next year my target will also be to reach Mt Ararat. Maybe I’ll get there, if I don’t get tempted by new-to-me books as I have been lately.