First Chapter First Paragraph: Appointment with Death

First chapterEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile by the Sea hosts First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros, where you can share the first paragraph, or a few, of a book you are reading or thinking about reading soon.

My choice this week is Appointment with Death by Agatha Christie, one of the few novels of hers that I haven’t read. It’s one of the earlier Poirot books, first published in 1938. It begins:

‘You do see, don’t you, that she’s got to be killed?’

The question floated out into the still night air, seemed to hang there a moment and then drift away down into  the darkness towards the Dead Sea.

Hercule Poirot paused a minute with his hand on the window catch. Frowning, he shut it decisively, thereby excluding any injurious night air! Hercule Poirot had been brought up to believe that all outside air was best left outside, and that night air was especially dangerous to the health.

Of course, this has me wondering who ‘she’ is, why she has to be killed and who is talking.

I don’t remember reading before about Poirot’s upbringing – intriguing to think of him as a child!

 

13 thoughts on “First Chapter First Paragraph: Appointment with Death”

  1. Is this the one that has Mrs. Boynton or something like that? I do remember reading this one a long time ago. And how fortuitous that Hercule Poirot happened to overhear their statement. Enjoy it!

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  2. What a classic opening–pulls the reader in, provides some insight into the detective, and sets the stage.

    I really need to find time to reread Christie–the Golden Age of Detective Writing, indeed!

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  3. Great opening, isn’t it? The good thing with Christie’s many books is that in many cases I’ve forgotten who the killer is, so can read them again with no loss of enjoyment.

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