Top Ten Tuesday: The Ten Most Recent Additions to My Bookshelf

Top Ten Tuesday 2020

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

The topic this week is:  The Ten Most Recent Additions to My Bookshelf. No wonder I have so many TBRs, they just keep on arriving. These are all e-books, except for the one hardback and two paperback books I received at Christmas and the little hardback Wainwright book I bought from Amazon.

Review copies:

  • Coming Up For Air by Sarah Leipciger – three extraordinary lives intertwine across oceans and time. Taking inspiration from a remarkable true story, this is a novel about the transcendent power of storytelling and the immeasurable impact of every human life.
  • The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elisabeth Gifford – a sweeping, powerful novel set on the Scottish island of St Kilda, following the last community to live there before it was evacuated in 1930.
  • The Sleepwalker by Joseph Knox –  the third book in the DC Aidan Waits series, set in Manchester, a dark thriller that begins as Waits is guarding a serial killer on his deathbed in a hospital.
  • The Mist by Ragnar Jónasson – the third book in the Hidden Iceland  trilogy about DI Hulda Hermannsdóttir, told in reverse chronological order.
  • The Last Protector (James Marwood and Cat Lovett, Book 4) by Andrew Taylor –  set in the late 17th century, under Charles II. Oliver Cromwell’s son, Richard, has abandoned his exile and slipped back into England.

Christmas presents:

  • Peterloo: the English Uprising by Robert Poole – non-fiction about the ‘Peterloo massacre’ on 18 August 1819 at St Peter’s Field, Manchester, when armed cavalry attacked a peaceful rally of some 50,000 pro-democracy reformers.
  • Oswald: Return of the King by Edoardo Albert – historical fiction, the second book in his Northumbrian Thrones series, set in the 7th century. Oswald has a rightful claim to the throne, but he is sick of bloodshed, and in his heart he longs to lay down his sword and join the monks of Iona.
  • The Watch House by Bernie McGill – historical fiction set on Rathlin, a remote Irish island, this is a story of infidelity, secrets and murder in a small Irish island community, inspired by Marconi’s experiments in wireless telegraphy in the late nineteenth century.

From Amazon:

  • The Eastern Fells: A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells by Alfred Wainwright. This is a beautiful little book, illustrated with his intricate pen and ink sketches of the landscape and the views from the summits as well as detailed maps of the footpaths. 
  • That Affair Next Door by Anna Katharine Green – a mystery first published in 1897, focusing on a murder that occurred in the house next door to the home of the curious Miss Butterworth.

Top Ten Tuesday: Most Anticipated Book Releases for the First Half of 2020

Top Ten Tuesday 2020

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

The topic this week is:  The Most Anticipated Book Releases for the First Half of 2020. Some are the next books in series that I’ve been reading and some are books by authors who are new to me.

Mirrot and the light

The Mirror and the Light (The Wolf Hall Trilogy) by Hilary Mantel – March – the final years of Thomas Cromwell’s life. I loved the first two books and am expecting this one to be just as good. Her books bring 16th century England to life in vivid colour and I have become very fond of Cromwell.

False Values

False Value (Rivers of London 8) by Ben Aaronovitch – February –  the latest book in this series that follows Peter Grant, an ordinary constable turned magician’s apprentice, as he solves crimes across London in a sensational blend of inventive urban fantasy, gripping mystery thriller, and hilarious fantasy caper. I’ve only read the first book in the series that I thought was absolutely fascinating.

Animals at Lockwood Manor

The Animals at Lockwood Manor by Jane Healey (March) – I haven’t read anything by her before. At the start of WW2 Hetty Cartwright, a museum curator in London in charge of the mammal collection is evacuated to Lockwood Manor, a creepy gothic house. When some of the animals go missing, and worse, Hetty begins to suspect someone – or something – is stalking her through the darkened corridors of the house.

Last Protector

The Last Protector (James Marwood and Cat Lovett, Book 4) by Andrew Taylor –  (April)  following James Marwood and Cat (Catherine) Lovett. I loved the first three, set in Restoration England. This one sees the return of Oliver Cromwell’s son, Richard.

Hamnet

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell – (March) a novel inspired by Shakespeare’s son this is the story of the heartbreaking loss which inspired his play, Hamlet. Maggie O’Farrell is one of my favourite authors.

A thousand moons

A Thousand Moons by Sebastian Barry – (March) this is a follow-up novel to Days Without End, a book I loved. It’s about Winona, a young Lakota orphan adopted by former soldiers Thomas McNulty and John Cole.

Remain silent

Remain Silent by Susie Steiner – (May) this is the third DI Manon Bradshaw murder mystery. I loved the earlier books in the series, both hugely gripping murder mysteries. In this book Manon investigates the death of a young migrant who is found hanging from a tree.

Hitler's secret

Hitler’s Secret by Rory Clements – (January) I’ve read Corpus, the first book in his Tom Wilde series and this is the fourth, so I have some catching up to do. This is a spy thriller set in 1941, when Cambridge professor, Tom Wilde is asked to smuggle a secret  package out of Germany.

The last day

The Last Day by Andrew Hunter Murray – (February) his debut novel. This is set 40 years into the future after the planet’s rotation has slowed to a halt, resulting in half the earth facing the constant light of the sun while the other half lives in an endless, frozen night.

The Deep by Alma Kastu – (March) I thought her earlier book, The Hunger, was an outstanding book and this new one looks just as impressive. It’s about the sinking of the Titanic and the ill-fated sail of its sister ship, the Britannic.

Top Ten Tuesday: Books on my Winter 2019-2020 To-Read List

TTT christmas

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

Here are some of the books I’d like to read this winter. Realistically I know it’ll take me longer than that (some are long) and that there’ll be some I won’t get round to and others that I’ll read instead.

  • Winter by Ali Smith – 4 four people, family and strangers spend Christmas in a fifteen-bedroom house in Cornwall but will there be enough room for them all? This is a library book, so I’ll probably read this first.
  • The John Lennon Letters edited by Hunter Davies. This is a long book and one that I’ll take my time reading.
  • Peterloo: the English Uprising by Robert Poole about the rally of around 50,000 people held in St Peter’s Field in Manchester on 16th August, 1819, to demand greater representation in Parliament. They were attacked by armed cavalry and 18 people were killed and some 700 injured. This is another long-term read as it looks so detailed and comprehensive.
  • The Dressmaker of Dachau by Mary Chamberlain, a WW2 novel about a young English seamstress who is taken prisoner and sent to Germany as slave labour. I really must read this one soon as a friend lent me this book months ago.
  • The Lady of the Ravens by Joanna Hickson, historical fiction set in the late 15th century, set in the Tower of London. Joan Veaux is lady in waiting to Elizabeth of York, who is married to Henry VII. She is the Lady Of The Ravens, who cares for and protects the famous ravens. Due to be published in January this is one of my NetGalley books.
  • Hitler’s Secrets by Rory Clements, another NetGalley book to be published in January. This is historical fiction and a spy thriller, featuring American Cambridge don Tom Wilde, beginning in autumn 1941 when the war is going badly for Britain and its allies.
  • Giant’s Bread by Agatha Christie writing as Mary Westmacott. This is not one of her crime fiction novels. Last year I enjoyed Absent in the Spring another book she wrote as Mary Westmacott.
  • The Butcher’s Hook by Janet Ellis, historical fiction set in Georgian London in the summer of 1763. Anne Jaccob, the elder daughter of well-to-do parents, meets Fub the butcher’s apprentice and is awakened to the possibilities of joy and passion.
  • A Killing Kindness by Reginald Hill, the 6th Dalziel and Pascoe novel. I’m currently reading the Dalziel and Pascoe novels in the order of publication and have nearly finished the 5th book.
  • Smallbone Deceased by Michael Gilbert or whichever book comes up for me in the Classics Club Spin. I hope it’ll be this one but will have to wait and see … if it isn’t I’ll definitely be reading it some time next year.

Looking back at last year’s Top Ten post ‘Winter 2018 TBR’

In advance of this coming Tuesday’s Top Ten post on our Winter TBRs I thought I’d  look back at last year’s Top Ten post Winter 2018 TBR to see how many of those books I actually read. (Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.)

Links from the book titles will take you to my reviews or to Goodreads.

I finished 6 of them! 

GreenmantleGreenmantle by John Buchan – from my Classics Club list. Yes

It’s the second of five novels featuring the character of Richard Hannay and is an adventure and spy story with a highly improbable plot. It’s pure escapism.

Bitter Lemons of CyprusBitter Lemons of Cyprus by Lawrence Durrell – Yes

I read this nonfiction about Durrell’s time in Cyprus, during the 1950s Enosis movement for freedom of the island from British colonial rule. His writing is richly descriptive and made me wish I could have seen Bellapaix in the 1950s.

The Accordionist by Fred Vargas – Yes

It’s the third book in The Accordionist (Three Evangelists 3)the Three Evangelists series and it’s probably the most puzzling of the three. They are quirky crime fiction novels, with eccentric characters and intricate plots.

The Old Man and the SeaThe Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway – No

I gave up on this book. It just didn’t appeal to me.

Wild Fire (Shetland Island, #8)Wild Fire by Ann Cleeves – No

I am amazed, I thought I had read it! It’s the 8th and last book in her Shetland series. I will read it soon.

The Lost ManThe Lost Man by Jane Harper – Yes

This is a powerful book, a family drama, set in an isolated part of Australia hundreds of miles from anywhere, revolving around the death of Cameron Bright. I loved it.

Once Upon a River by Diane Setterfield – Yes

Once Upon a River

An intriguing and mystifying book, historical fiction with a touch of magic that completely beguiled me with its mysteries and fascinating characters. A badly injured stranger enters the Swan Inn at Radcot carrying the drowned corpse of a little girl. Hours later the dead child, miraculously it seems, takes a breath, and returns to life. 

The Glass Woman by Caroline Lea – Yes

The Glass WomanSet in Iceland in 1686, this has a dark atmosphere, saturated in sadness, fear and superstition. It’s a story of suspicion, love and violence, as a body surfaces from the ice-crusted sea, a body that had been weighted down with stones. It was too long, too drawn out and slow, especially in the first half of the book for me.

Mythos: The Greek Myths Retold

 

Mythos: the Greek Myths Retold by Stephen Fry – No

I began it but put it aside for a while, can’t think why that was. I will get back to it.

The BrontësThe Brontës by Juliet Barker – No

I did start it, but I found the sheer size of it and the small font made it difficult to read, but I shall persevere.

Top Ten Tuesday: ‘Winter’ Books

top-ten-tuesday-new

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

This week’s topic is a Freebie and I’m focusing on books with Winter in the titles.

  1. A Winter Book by Tove Jansson – a  collection of some of Tove Jansson’s best loved and most famous stories.
  2. The Nature of Winter by Jim Crumley –  a nature writer reflecting on mountain legends, dear departed friends and an enduring fascination and deep love for nature.
  3. Winter: an Anthology for the Changing Seasons edited by Melissa Harrison – a collection of prose and poetry about the winter season.
  4. The Winter Ghosts by Kate Mosse – a story of two lives touched by war and transformed by courage set in the winter of 1928.
  5. Winter by Christopher Nicholson – a novel about the last years of the writer and poet Thomas Hardy and his second wife.
  6. Winter by Ali Smith – 4 four people, family and strangers spend Christmas in a fifteen-bedroom house in Cornwall but will there be enough room for them all?
  7. Winter Solstice by Rosemary Pilcher – about Elfrida and Oscar, in the evening of their lives, as the winter solstice brings love and solace.
  8. A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy –  about an Irish woman, Chicky Starr, who opens a hotel, and the people who come to stay for the first week.
  9. Winter Holiday by Arthur Ransome, Swallows and Amazons Book 4 – ice skating, blizzards, igloos and a polar expedition.
  10. The Willows in Winter by William Horwood – in this re-creation of The Wind in the Willows, William Horwood, the author of the Duncton trilogies, brings to life the characters of Badger, Water Rat, Mole and Toad.

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Holiday Reading

top-ten-tuesday-new

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

This week’s topic: is Books you love reading during the holiday season. Here are some Christmas themed books I’ve read in the past and one I want to read this year.

  1. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens, I often re-read this around Christmas time. This was the first Dickens I read. My Great Aunt gave me this for Christmas one year when I was a child and I’ve loved it ever since.
  2. The Big Book of Christmas Mysteries:The Most Complete Collection of Yuletide Whodunits Ever Assembled edited by Otto Penzler is a big book of 647 pages – so I have an e-book version and dip into into it each Christmas.
  3. A Maigret Christmas by Georges Simenon –  the Inspector receives two unexpected visitors on Christmas Day.
  4. Hercule Poirot’s Christmas by Agatha Christie – Christmas Eve with the Lee family and Poirot.
  5. The Christmas Train by David Baldacci – part detective story, part disaster movie, part romance.
  6. The Santa Klaus Murder  by Gladys Mitchell, a classic locked room murder mystery.
  7. The Christmas Mystery by Jostein Gaarder is a good book to read during Advent.
  8. A Feast for Advent Delia offers help in escaping for a few minutes each day to contemplate the meaning of Christmas, providing a journey through Advent, illustrated with photographs.
  9. Skipping Christmas by John Grisham. This is not the usual Grisham legal thriller, but a very funny little book about the horrors, commercialisation and expense of Christmas.
  10. Snow on the Cobbles by Maggie Sullivan – to read. Christmas on Coronation Street at the end of  the Second World War.

 

Top Ten Tuesday: Favourite Bookmarks 

top-ten-tuesday-new

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

This week’s topic: Favourite Bookmarks: 

I use a variety of bookmarks, sometimes just a till receipt or scrap of paper if that’s all I have handy, but these are more traditional bookmarks that I usually use:

Bookmark group

I also like to mark individual lines – I used to use post-its until I discovered book darts:

 

The bookmarks I use most often are Barter Book bookmarks:

Barter Books bkmark
Showing both sides of a Barter Books bookmark