Top Ten Tuesday: The Ten Most Recent Additions to My Bookshelf

Top Ten Tuesday 2020

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

The topic this week is:  The Ten Most Recent Additions to My Bookshelf. No wonder I have so many TBRs, they just keep on arriving. These are all e-books, except for the one hardback and two paperback books I received at Christmas and the little hardback Wainwright book I bought from Amazon.

Review copies:

  • Coming Up For Air by Sarah Leipciger – three extraordinary lives intertwine across oceans and time. Taking inspiration from a remarkable true story, this is a novel about the transcendent power of storytelling and the immeasurable impact of every human life.
  • The Lost Lights of St Kilda by Elisabeth Gifford – a sweeping, powerful novel set on the Scottish island of St Kilda, following the last community to live there before it was evacuated in 1930.
  • The Sleepwalker by Joseph Knox –  the third book in the DC Aidan Waits series, set in Manchester, a dark thriller that begins as Waits is guarding a serial killer on his deathbed in a hospital.
  • The Mist by Ragnar Jónasson – the third book in the Hidden Iceland  trilogy about DI Hulda Hermannsdóttir, told in reverse chronological order.
  • The Last Protector (James Marwood and Cat Lovett, Book 4) by Andrew Taylor –  set in the late 17th century, under Charles II. Oliver Cromwell’s son, Richard, has abandoned his exile and slipped back into England.

Christmas presents:

  • Peterloo: the English Uprising by Robert Poole – non-fiction about the ‘Peterloo massacre’ on 18 August 1819 at St Peter’s Field, Manchester, when armed cavalry attacked a peaceful rally of some 50,000 pro-democracy reformers.
  • Oswald: Return of the King by Edoardo Albert – historical fiction, the second book in his Northumbrian Thrones series, set in the 7th century. Oswald has a rightful claim to the throne, but he is sick of bloodshed, and in his heart he longs to lay down his sword and join the monks of Iona.
  • The Watch House by Bernie McGill – historical fiction set on Rathlin, a remote Irish island, this is a story of infidelity, secrets and murder in a small Irish island community, inspired by Marconi’s experiments in wireless telegraphy in the late nineteenth century.

From Amazon:

  • The Eastern Fells: A Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells by Alfred Wainwright. This is a beautiful little book, illustrated with his intricate pen and ink sketches of the landscape and the views from the summits as well as detailed maps of the footpaths. 
  • That Affair Next Door by Anna Katharine Green – a mystery first published in 1897, focusing on a murder that occurred in the house next door to the home of the curious Miss Butterworth.

19 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: The Ten Most Recent Additions to My Bookshelf

  1. Margaret, I’m not familiar with any of these authors but every one of these books looks interesting, particularly the three Christmas nonfiction.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Some of these are new to me too, so I’m hoping I’ll like them. The Watch House was a surprise present but the other two Christmas books were on my wishlist.

      Like

  2. You have some great choices there, Margaret. I’m especially interested in the Poole and the Taylor. I do like history. When the book is done well, you’re learning as well as enjoying the characters, etc.. I hope you’ll like all of these.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve always loved history – the Peterloo book is especially interesting to me as when I worked as a librarian in Manchester I compiled a bibliography of the library’s holdings about Peterloo.

      Liked by 2 people

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