Top Ten Tuesday: Books with Moon in the Title

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog. The topic this week is a Freebie: Books with Moon in the Title.

Moon Tiger by Penelope Lively – 1987 Booker Prize winner – a novel about a historian in her seventies looking back over her life.

The Moon and Sixpence by W Somerset Maugham – about Charles Strickland, who was a stockbroker, a boring man, who left his wife and family after seventeen years of marriage and fled to Paris, because he wanted to paint. His wife and friends would have found it more acceptable if he had left her for another woman.

Moonlight and the Pearler’s Daughter by Lizzie Pook – historical fiction set in 19th century Australia. Charles Brightwell, a pearler, goes missing from his ship while out at sea. It seems he just disappeared and no one can tell his daughter, Eliza what happened to him, but she is convinced there is more to the story and refuses to believe her father is dead.

A Thousand Moons by Sebastian Barry – historical fiction set in the American West in the 1870s, in the aftermath of the Civil War. It continues the story of Thomas McNulty and John Cole, and Winona, the young Indian girl they had adopted.

Playing With the Moon by Eliza Graham – more historical fiction, moving from 1944 to the present. The book deals with memory, the power of memory, with loss, grief and bereavement. It’s also about war, the legacy of war, and of how to make sense of our lives.

The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins – the Moonstone, a large diamond, originally stolen from a statue of an Indian God and said to be cursed is left to Rachel Verinder. She receives it on her 18th birthday and that night it is stolen from her bedroom. Chief suspects are three Indian jugglers, who are Hindu priests dedicated to retrieving the jewel.

Moonflower Murders by Anthony Horowitz – A labyrinth of clues, a mystery novel hiding a deadly secret, a killer with a fiendish plot: a brilliantly intricate and original thriller. 

Moon over Soho by Ben Aaronvitch – the second Rivers of London novel. This one is about the murder of Cyrus Wilkinson, a part-time jazz saxophonist, who had apparently dropped dead of a heart attack just after finishing a gig in a Soho jazz club. 

Two Moons by Jennifer Johnston – set in Dublin this is the story of three women, Mimi and her daughter Grace who live in a house overlooking Dublin Bay, and Mimi’s mother Grace, an actress, who is absorbed in rehearsals for Hamlet in which she is playing Gertrude.

The Moon Sister by Lucinda Riley – the 5th book in the The Seven Sisters series, based on the legends of The Seven Sisters of the Pleiades. This one is about Tiggy D’Apilese, the fifth sister adopted by Pa Salt and brought up in their childhood home, ‘Atlantis’ – a fabulous, secluded castle situated on the shores of Lake Geneva. 

25 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: Books with Moon in the Title

  1. I’d never have imagined that moon would be such a popular word for titles. I’ve read only two of your choices – The Moonstone and Moon Tiger which I loved.
    Had planned to read Moon and Sixpence but seeing your review had made me pause.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh dear, that is a shame! It took me a while to get into the rhythm of Maugham’s style and read The Moon and Sixpence revived my interest in Gauguin’ work and made me want to read more of Maugham’s novels and short stories.

      Like

  2. Glad to see The Moonstone here, Margaret. What I liked about that one is the variety of different perspectives from which the story’s told. It’s really interesting, actually. And I want to read The Moonflower Murders; I’ve liked the Horowitz books I’ve read.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thank you for sharing your list. It is always interesting to see a common “thing” among books even if the books themselves have nothing in common.

    Like

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