The Classics Club

The Classics ClubThe Classics Club is a club created to inspire people to read and blog about classic books. There’s no time limit to join.You simply sign up to read and write on your blog about at least 50 classic books in at most five years.

I’ve dithered about joining The Classics Club for over a year now and have finally decided to take the plunge. I’m good at listing books, even if after that I don’t read them all, or write about them.

The 50 books on this list are all books I own, either physical books on the bookshelves or e-books on Kindle  They do say that you shouldn’t plan too far into the future, and going off what’s happened in the last five years that’s a good thing, but I would like to think that I’ll read them within the next five years (that is by April 2018!!). I like the fact that this doesn’t have to be a fixed list – this is my initial list, which I’ve already changed since I started compiling it!

I’ve listed them in a-z author order.

  1. Lady Susan, The Watsons, Sanditon by Jane Austen
  2. Mansfield Park by Jane Austen (re-read)
  3. The Old Wives Tale by Arnold Bennett
  4. Lorna Doone: A Romance of Exmoor by R D Blackmore
  5. Lady Audley’s Secret by M E Braddon
  6. The Thirty Nine Steps by John Buchan
  7. The Making of a Marchioness by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  8. My Antonia by Willa Cather
  9. Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
  10. No Name by Wilkie Collins
  11. Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
  12. A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe
  13. Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe
  14. Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens
  15. Nicholas Nickleby by Charles Dickens
  16. Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens
  17. Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens
  18. The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens
  19. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
  20. Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
  21. Out of Africa – Isak Dinesen
  22. The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
  23. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  24. Adam Bede by George Eliot
  25. The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot
  26. Silas Marner by George Eliot
  27. Parade’s End by Ford Maddox Ford
  28. The Women’s Room by Marilyn French
  29. The Forsyte Saga (1-3) by John Galsworthy
  30. Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell
  31. North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell
  32. Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell
  33. Notre-Dame of Paris by Victor Hugo
  34. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  35. Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome
  36. The Man Who Would Be King by Rudyard Kipling
  37. Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  38. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
  39. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham
  40. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  41. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  42. Of Human Bondage by W Somerset Maugham
  43. Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
  44. Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes by Robert Louis Stevenson
  45. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift
  46. Barchester Towers (Barsetshire Chronicles, #2) by Anthony Trollope
  47. The Color Purple by Alice Walker
  48. The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
  49. Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton
  50. The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf

11 thoughts on “The Classics Club

  1. Margaret – The classics have a lot to offer us and so many of them are brilliantly written. I look forward to your reviews as you take on this challenge.

    Like

  2. I do hope you’ll do well in this challenge and write reviews for us. Good luck with Moby Dick. I read that one when I was 18, on vacation in Key West if you can believe it. If you can get through all the tedium of too much information about whales and whaling, you’ve got it made. And it’s worth the effort.

    Like

  3. I have no idea why I haven’t joined this challenge–50 classics in 5 years seems extremely doable. I like your a-z order and the fact that the list is mutable. I’ll be looking forward to reading your classics posts, for sure!

    Like

  4. I did join this challenge but haven’t been linking to any of my reviews as I read them, must do better! I’ve read about half on your list but not any by Dickens at all. I’m going to read The Old Wives Tale soon I think.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.