August’s Books and Crime Fiction Pick of the Month

Most of my reading time in August was taken with reading Charles Dickens’s Our Mutual Friend, but I did read 7 other books too, all 7 of them crime fiction, although you could consider Our Mutual Friend as a type of crime fiction too. They are (in the order I finished reading them):

  1.  Lord Edgware Dies by Agatha Christie
  2. Started Early, Took my Dog by Kate Atkinson
  3. Postern of Fate by Agatha Christie
  4. Guilty Consciences a collection of short stories edited by Martin Edwards
  5. A Room Full of Bones by Elly Griffiths – post to follow
  6. The Girl on the Stairs by Louise Welsh
  7. Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens
  8. The Old Man in the Corner by Baroness Orczy

The links are to my posts on the books.

My Crime Fiction Pick of the Month is The Girl on the Stairs by Louise Welsh. Actually with the exception of Postern of Fate and The Old Man in the Corner it’s a close call between the other books.

The Girl on the Stairs is Louise Welsh’s latest book. It’s a tense psychological thriller about Jane, who is pregnant and living in Berlin, suspicious about her neighbours, as she hears screams from the next apartment, sees shadows on the stairs and feels she is being watched. Are her suspicions justified or is she paranoid? Read more …

Kerrie has a round-up post of bloggers’ book choices for the month, so for more recommendations, go to Mysteries in Paradise.

4 thoughts on “August’s Books and Crime Fiction Pick of the Month”

  1. Margaret – You had some interesting choices here! And it sounds as though you chose a good ‘un as your pick of the month. I’ll be very much interested to see what you think of the Atkinson; I’m very much looking forward to your review.

    Like

  2. I haven’t read any Welsh, although I do remember someone I worked with being very excited by her first book. Have you read anything else? And if so, is this the place to start or with another novel?

    Like

    1. Alex, I’ve read two more of Louise Welsh’s books – Naming the Bones, which I wrote about here and The Cutting Room, which I read before I wrote this blog. I liked both, although they are very different, so I suppose you could start with any of them. The Cutting Room is gothic and dark about a dissolute and promiscuous auctioneer who finds a collection of photographs – disturbing photos – and he feels compelled to find out more about their deceased owner. It won the Crime Writers’ Association Creasey Dagger for the best first crime novel. Whereas Naming the Bones is a mystery concerning the death of a poet. As I read this more recently than The Cutting Room, it’s a lot clearer in my memory and maybe you could start with that one.

      Like

  3. I love ‘Our Mutual Friend’ and I think you call it crime fiction. My favourite Dickens book is ‘Bleak House’ though. I reread it every couple of years and I never want to leave that world.

    Like

Comments are closed.