August’s Books Part One

Books read in August

The Crooked House ‘“ Agatha Christie
Made in Heaven ‘“ Adele Geras
The Secret History ‘“ Donna Tartt
The Amber Spyglass ‘“ Philip Pullman
Season of the Witch ‘“ Natasha Mostert

I started August reading The Crooked House by Agatha Christie, which I had borrowed from the library. It’™s been a long time since I’™d read any of Agatha Christie’™s books and I felt like reading something quick and easy after some of the long books I’™ve read this year. This is a short book and an easy read, but enjoyable because I didn’™t have to think too much and I guessed the murderer’™s identity. Sometimes that’™s annoying but in this instance I found it satisfying to spot the clues along the way ‘“ and be right.

Agatha Christie described this as “one of my best.” Neither Miss Marple nor Hercule Poirot feature in the book and as my current knowledge of Christie’s books are from the TV programmes I found this a refreshing change. That’s not to say I dislike Miss Marple and Poirot – on the contrary I avidly read and enjoyed many of the books featuring these two characters and love both Joan Hickson’s and David Suchet’s performances and the productions as a whole.

Aristide, the head of the Leonides family has been murdered with a fatal barbiturate injection. It seemed that they were one big happy family living in a sprawling, ramshackle mansion, but things are not what they seem. His young widow, fifty years his junior, is the obvious suspect. But the murderer has reckoned without the tenacity of Charles Hayward, fianc̩ of Sophia, the late millionaireժs granddaughter.

Next up was Adele Geras’™s Made in Heaven. It’™s a story that pulls you along ‘“ even though I could see where it was heading and the ending was no surprise. The main themes of the book are marriage and divorce and relationships. A traditional wedding is being planned between Zannah and Adrian. The story opens with the lunch that has been arranged so that Zannah’™s parents can meet Adrian’™s mother and stepfather. Zannah wants a perfect, elaborate and very expensive wedding, to make up for her first wedding in a Registry Office, which ended in divorce. She knows exactly what she wants ‘“ the dress, flowers, church, reception and so on. The first problem that arises is the strange behaviour of Joss, Zannah’s mother, on meeting Adrian’™s parents and everything goes downhill from then on, from her relationship with Adrian and Cal, her ex-husband to that of Adrian with Isis, Zannah’™s daughter. Obviously there is a secret that will eventually surface and cause complications all round.

The characters are believable and the analysis of their relationships is good, so much so that I found some of the characters exasperating. The descriptions of the wedding preparations, the homes and garden, the beautiful dress materials, the sumptuous, delicious food bring the book to life, although I found it intriguing that one of the locations is Altrincham. I used to live near Altrincham and went to school there, but apart from the name I didn’t recognise it in this book – but then that wasn’t important in terms of the plot. However, I did get quite excited when “Altrincham” was mentioned as I’ve never come across it in fiction before and wanted more detail.

The Secret History by Donna Tartt, The Amber Spyglass by Philip Pullman and Season of the Witch by Natasha Mostert are much longer books.

I found all of them to be satisfying and excellent books. I’™ve already written about Season of the Witch here. The Amber Spyglass is the final book in Philip Pullman’™s trilogy His Dark Materials and I’™ll write a separate post about all three books.

Donna Tartt’™s Secret History is a contrast to the other books. The story is narrated by a boy who leaves California to attend a college in New England and becomes involved with a group of students studying ancient Greek. From the back cover:

‘œUnder the influence of their charismatic classics professor, a group of clever, eccentric misfits at an elite New England college discover a way of thinking and living that is a world away from the humdrum existence of their contemporaries. But when they go beyond the boundaries of normal morality their lives are changed profoundly and for ever.’

There is a death recounted in the prologue. The book then goes back in time and the mystery unfolds. I found it just a bit too long and drawn out in parts and wanted to wind it up before it actually finished, but taken as a whole the tension and pace of the book was maintained.

6 thoughts on “August’s Books Part One”

  1. I have the Adele Geras book waiting for me. I’m not sure when I will get to it. I also want to read Donna Tartt’s book. It is one I have had on my TBR pile for literally years. I’ll get to it eventually, too…

    Like

  2. What a nice round up for August. I enjoyed Secret History. I read it as an airplane book a few years ago and it did a nice job of being engaging without too much effort.

    Like

  3. I’m going to be really interested in what you think of the entire Pullman trilogy. The final book has a lot of very interesting philosophical ideas in it.

    Like

  4. Danielle, I’ve had Secret History a while too, but I’m glad I got round to it.Stefanie, was it a long plane trip? It took me a while to read – as you say without too much effort, but it’s quite long.Ann, the Pullman trilogy is fascinating and it’s taking me a while to pull my thoughts together – some very interesting concepts indeed.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s