Top Ten Tuesday: Books with the word ‘Winter’ in the Titles

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

This week’s topic is a Holiday/Seasonal Freebie (holiday books/covers/titles, wintry reads, snow on cover, cool color covers, etc. So I’ve chosen ten books with the word ‘Winter‘ in the titles.

A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy – Stone House, set high on the cliffs on the west coast of Ireland, overlooking the windswept Atlantic Ocean, was falling into disrepair – until one woman, with a past she needed to forget, breathed new life into the place. Now a hotel, with a big warm kitchen and log fires, it provides a welcome few can resist.

Midwinter Murder by Agatha Christie – a winter-themed collection of short stories by Agatha Christie, some featuring Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Beware of deadly snowdrifts and dangerous gifts, poisoned meals and mysterious guests.

Midwinter of the Spirit by Phil Rickman – as an early winter slices through the old city of Hereford, a body is found in the River Wye, an ancient church is desecrated and signs of evil appear in the cathedral itself, where the tomb of a medieval saint lies in pieces.

The Winter Wolf by Holly Webb – Amelia is exploring the huge, old house where her family are spending Christmas when she finds a diary hidden in the attic. It was written by a boy struggling to look after an abandoned wolf pup. Before she knows it, Amelia is transported into the wintry world of the diary.

Winter Solstice by Rosamunde Pilcher – the Christmas season weaves its magical spell and for Elfrida and Oscar, in the evening of their lives, the winter solstice brings love and solace.

The Winter Ghosts by Kate Mosse – Traveling through the French Pyrenees to process the horrors of World War I, Freddie meets a lovely young woman also in mourning with whom he exchanges stories that unravel a centuries-old mystery.

The Winter Garden Mystery by Frances Brody – set in 1923 Daisy Dalrymple is visiting Occles Hall in Cheshire, the home of her school friend Bobbie, to write an article for the Town and Country magazine and discovers a corpse buried in the Winter Garden.

A Place Called Winter by Patrick Gale – a shy but privileged elder son, Harry Cane has followed convention at every step. Even the beginnings of an illicit, dangerous affair do little to shake him – until the shock of discovery and the threat of arrest force him to abandon his wife and child and sign up for emigration to Canada.

Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah – a mysterious love story that spans sixty-five years and moves from frozen, war torn Leningrad to modern-day Alaska. Sisters, Meredith and Nina finally learn the secret of their mother’s past and uncover a truth so terrible it will shake the foundation of their family and change who they think they are.

Winter of the World by Ken Follett – set in 1933 and shaken by the tyranny and the prospect of war, five interconnected families’ lives become ever more enmeshed. An international clash of military power and personal beliefs is sweeping the world, but what will this new war mean for those who must live through it?

14 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: Books with the word ‘Winter’ in the Titles

  1. I like your choices, Margaret – they’re great! I hadn’t thought about how many books there are with ‘Winter’ in the title, but there really are a lot. And there are so many different sorts of books here, too – fantasy, crime fiction, thrillers, and more. I call that a real selection!

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  2. I listed books with ‘Winter’ in the title this week too, but all ten of mine were historical fiction. I enjoyed A Place Called Winter but haven’t read any of the others on your list.

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  3. I’ve read two of your books, Midwinter of the Spirit and The Wintergarden Mystery. I rather fancy A Week in Winter and Winter Solstice, both sound good.

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