Top Ten Tuesday: Books on my Winter 2019-2020 To-Read List

TTT christmas

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme created by The Broke and the Bookish and now hosted by Jana at That Artsy Reader Girl. For the rules see her blog.

Here are some of the books I’d like to read this winter. Realistically I know it’ll take me longer than that (some are long) and that there’ll be some I won’t get round to and others that I’ll read instead.

  • Winter by Ali Smith – 4 four people, family and strangers spend Christmas in a fifteen-bedroom house in Cornwall but will there be enough room for them all? This is a library book, so I’ll probably read this first.
  • The John Lennon Letters edited by Hunter Davies. This is a long book and one that I’ll take my time reading.
  • Peterloo: the English Uprising by Robert Poole about the rally of around 50,000 people held in St Peter’s Field in Manchester on 16th August, 1819, to demand greater representation in Parliament. They were attacked by armed cavalry and 18 people were killed and some 700 injured. This is another long-term read as it looks so detailed and comprehensive.
  • The Dressmaker of Dachau by Mary Chamberlain, a WW2 novel about a young English seamstress who is taken prisoner and sent to Germany as slave labour. I really must read this one soon as a friend lent me this book months ago.
  • The Lady of the Ravens by Joanna Hickson, historical fiction set in the late 15th century, set in the Tower of London. Joan Veaux is lady in waiting to Elizabeth of York, who is married to Henry VII. She is the Lady Of The Ravens, who cares for and protects the famous ravens. Due to be published in January this is one of my NetGalley books.
  • Hitler’s Secrets by Rory Clements, another NetGalley book to be published in January. This is historical fiction and a spy thriller, featuring American Cambridge don Tom Wilde, beginning in autumn 1941 when the war is going badly for Britain and its allies.
  • Giant’s Bread by Agatha Christie writing as Mary Westmacott. This is not one of her crime fiction novels. Last year I enjoyed Absent in the Spring another book she wrote as Mary Westmacott.
  • The Butcher’s Hook by Janet Ellis, historical fiction set in Georgian London in the summer of 1763. Anne Jaccob, the elder daughter of well-to-do parents, meets Fub the butcher’s apprentice and is awakened to the possibilities of joy and passion.
  • A Killing Kindness by Reginald Hill, the 6th Dalziel and Pascoe novel. I’m currently reading the Dalziel and Pascoe novels in the order of publication and have nearly finished the 5th book.
  • Smallbone Deceased by Michael Gilbert or whichever book comes up for me in the Classics Club Spin. I hope it’ll be this one but will have to wait and see … if it isn’t I’ll definitely be reading it some time next year.

6 thoughts on “Top Ten Tuesday: Books on my Winter 2019-2020 To-Read List

  1. These all look good, Margaret. Perhaps it’s just that I’m in the mood for a longer book right now, but my eye is drawn both to the Davies and to the Poole. Both sound like books to be savoured over time, rather than read quickly, and sometimes, the time is just right for that.

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  2. I read Giant’s Bread earlier this year and really enjoyed it. It’s the only Mary Westmacott book I’ve read but I’m looking forward to reading more of them. I also have The Lady of the Ravens on my NetGalley shelf, so I should be reading it soon too.

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  3. I have Smallbone Deceased on my tbr pile too. Hitler’s Secret appeals to me, I seem to be in a permanent ‘wanting to read about the world wars’ mode. Something I would never have imagined just a few years ago. Enjoy your winter 2020 reading, Margaret. I can’t wait.

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