First Chapter, First Paragraph

First chapterEvery Tuesday Diane at Bibliophile by the Sea hosts First Chapter First Paragraph Tuesday Intros, where you can share the first paragraph, or a few, of a book you are reading or thinking about reading soon.

I’ve just finished A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khalid Hosseini, a wonderful, heartbreaking book but now I feel in need of something lighter and more frivolous to read. High Rising by Angela Thirkell may be that book (one of my 20 books for Summer).

Blurb:

Successful lady novelist Laura Morland and her boisterous young son Tony set off to spend Christmas at her country home in the sleepy surrounds of High Rising. But Laura’s wealthy friend and neighbour George Knox has taken on a scheming secretary whose designs on marriage to her employer threaten the delicate social fabric of the village. Can clever, practical Laura rescue George from Miss Grey’s clutches and, what’s more, help his daughter Miss Sibyl Knox to secure her longed-for engagement?

Utterly charming and very funny, High Rising is irresistible comic entertainment.

It begins:

The headmaster’s wife twisted herself round in her chair to talk to Mrs Morland, who was sitting in the row just behind her.

‘I can’t make it out,’ she said reflectively, ‘why all the big boys seem to be at the bottom of preparatory schools and the small boys at the top. All those lower boys who got prizes were quite large, average children, but when we get to the upper forms they all look about seven, and undersized at that. Look at the head of the Remove for instance – he is just coming up the platform steps now.’

On the back cover it’s described as:

Irresistibly entertaining and witty, High Rising, originally published in 1933, was the first of Angela Thirkell’s celebrated classic comedies.

What do you think? If you’ve read it did you find it irresistibly entertaining and witty?

9 thoughts on “First Chapter, First Paragraph”

  1. I enjoyed High Rising very much indeed… and subsequent books in the series even more. Delightful books… beautifully observed and lovely gentle humour.

    Like

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